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Thread: The Mos Eisley Cantina - Star Wars Discussion Thread

  1. #81
    Senior Member SirSam's Avatar
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    The prequels have the core of a good story in them but I feel like Lucas needed more people around him telling he needed to refine it. Much in the way in the WWE Vince McMahon is the final word and at times it seems there is no one who will challenge him I think Lucas ended up with a few too many yes men around who didn't stop him when he step in when, for instance, he wrote a love scene the way he did.

    When the first two came out I was 10 and 13 so I enjoyed them at that age but as I grew up I did start to see the rougher edges of what they were. They are still Star Wars though so I will still watch them, even to this day.

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  2. #82
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    The thing is, people need to stop pretending the Originals are perfect. The truth is they're as flawed as the Prequels, and of course they are; they were written by the same bloke. Terrible dialogue, bizarre plot contrivances and irritating comic relief is all over them too, as is the terrible writing of love scenes. All that business about Leia "liking scoundrels" is cringe-worthy, and lest we forget that originally Han was meant to say "I love you too." The difference is that the Originals have nostalgia on their side - and the small matter of changing the face of cinema, I guess! But from a story perspective, I maintain they're just as imperfect as the Prequels.

    At least that's the cynical view. I prefer to say, as I always do, that the Prequels are just as good as the Originals, because ultimately you don't love Star Wars because they're incredibly well crafted movies. You love them because they collectively tell an incredible story!
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  3. #83
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    There are some good points in there, though I think you're overplaying them a little. Sure, nostalgia has an impact - but I think that had more to do with building expectation for the prequels than anything. They could never live up to them, though that doesn't really mean that the prequels actually came that close. And lord knows the first films aren't perfect - you're right, the dialogue was always fucking shocking.

    But there's a few things that have more of an impact, for me. I've never really written a lot of this down so I'm feeling my way as I go, but I'll try and give voice to it.

    I think we make a mistake when we think of the first three as legitimate trilogy anyway. There's enough directorial and character continuity that they hang together, but personally I always think of it as more of a standalone movie, and then a two-parter. Of those three films, the two-parter effectively saves ROTJ. That isn't a good movie on its own terms, particularly, and if you want to poke holes in it you can, but there's enough connected to the very strong Empire to save it, not least because of the way that it's so tied to the end of the previous film.

    Empire Strikes Back is the one good film that really opens up the Star Wars universe, and that probably kickstars any of the interest in prequels and the like in the first place.

    And that leaves Star Wars, and the truth about Star Wars is that while it is this huge epic movie and story, at the root of it all it's a cinematic greatest hits. A lot of sci-fi is like this - pretty much any iteration of Star Trek is really as much of a western as it is a space opera, for example, and George Lucas quite clearly cannibalised the films he liked to make Star Wars. So it was by turns a bit Noirish, then a samurai film, then a world war two dogfight, and so on.

    I'm not telling you all this stuff that you already know for no purpose, but am coming to the point. Essentially the development of Star Wars under Lucas was from a cinematic jigsaw puzzle into the one really good movie rooted in the mythology of the Universe. Then the cracks are already showing by the last film of the original trilogy.

    That leads to the prequels. The problem of the first two prequels seems to me that a lot of the elements of the original universe don't stand up to the kind of pressures that the prequels put them under. The Jedi are the biggest example of this, as it's hard to tell the story of the fall of the Jedi without ruining what had made them work in the first place. If you look back at the first few, the Jedi are basically too good to fail. There's a safety in having their fall located in the past, before we come on screen. That way they're actually given a gloss by the fact they are endangered. But going back and telling that story - introducing concepts like arrogance - only weakens the mystique. Similarly, the force itself is best left as it is in the originals, as a barely understood mystical energy that no one looks that closely into. Poring over it and introducing a bit of Trekkie pseudoscience.... well, hardly anyone thinks the midicholorian stuff was a good idea outside of a handful of philosophers who have forgotten that first and foremost this is an action drama.

    So this is what I think in a nutshell. I could bang on about the stock characters being worse in the prequels than they were in the originals, but that's a bit of a moot point. What I think is more compelling is that you've got these ideas that work in a standalone film, but that become far more rocky premises when you start to pick at them and explore them. In many cases they are simple elements that are best kept simple. The story we wanted to be told, how Anakin came to be, is probably not the best story for George Lucas to tell, as weird as that sounds. Getting hung up in the universe at the expense of what made the first movies work is why, for me, the first two films always felt kind of turgid and why it is hard to even concentrate on them while you're watching them.

    I read a lot of the novels in the franchise and one of the things that became apparent to me is that different authors were able to handle the universe with different degrees of success, and to be honest.... I'm not sure George Lucas was actually that great at handling his own mythology. Empire Strikes Back is a really good combination of those elements with a straightforward and honest-to-goodness action movie, and I don't think that he's able to combine those elements again successfully until the last prequel. I guess I believe that George Lucas, as much as anyone else, was weighed down by the scale of the response to his own creation.

    One thing I would have found interesting is if they'd had more restrictions on Lucas - like, if they'd said TPM is too long, edit it down to 2 hours flat - if they'd have been able to iron out some of those things that I find problematic.

  4. #84
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    Great post Pete, and I agree with a lot of it, especially Lucas not really being the best hand to guide his own creation and Empire being the major star of the franchise. It also always bears mentioning that Lucas was not in fact in the director's chair for Empire, or for RotJ for that matter, and I think that does lend further benefit to the original franchise as Lucas really isn't much of a director at the end of the day.

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    Cheers Mizfan. Wasn't fully sure of a lot of this as I was going so glad it wasn't all horseshit.

    On the note about Lucas, the other thing to factor in is that Empire and Jedi don't have so much Lucas in them. He contrives the story but the screenplay for those two is treated at the end of it, whereas the only prequel that gets the same treatment is Episode II, where he was left gunshy after the response to TPM. And as you say, he didn't direct those two, but did direct A New Hope and all of the prequels. So if you see those as more collaborative affairs and those are your favourites, I'd say there's no guarantees that you'd be on board with the unrestrained Lucas you get in the prequels, and especially in The Phantom Menace before he'd lowered his stock a little bit.

    I mean, I actually still like the third prequel, which he wrote and directed - but I think he had a far better idea of what needed to happen for Anakin even if the rest of the world is hazier. I also think he learns a bit from the experience - and you might say mistakes - of the first two prequels.

  6. #86
    Senior Member SirSam's Avatar
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    Hey, you may have seen this in one of your social feeds but I thought I'd pop it in. For Halloween a couple of Youtubers made up some Star Wars Speeder bikes and drove them around New York.

    The video is fun, there is some pretty good reactions and they do a pretty damn good job at imitating the look of a speeder. The real meat though is in the making of videos that are linked after.

    Last edited by SirSam; 10-31-2017 at 06:03 AM. Reason: Linked wrong video

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  7. #87
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    Prime, I'm not sure I fully understand. you claim ROTJ is poor as a stand-alone film and saved by being a two-parter, but seem to give Empire plenty of merit on its own terms. Shouldn't Empire be subject to the same critique? I mean, as a stand-alone it doesn't even have an ending. So too, as a stand-alone, is its structure back to front as it throws its biggest set piece out at the very start then grinds the pace down bit by bit by bit as it progresses. It can't really be described as an action movie either, quite honestly. Sure there's action in there, but it's comfortably the slowest paced of the entire Saga, and the whole central portion of the film is dialogue and character driven, hinging on a teacher and a love story, thereby resembling a space drama more than anything else.

    Also, you note Empire as being the best because it "opens up the universe," but then seem to decry the Prequels for exploring things too much. Am I right in thinking that expanding the universe - showing more of it, that is - is, to your mind, a good thing, while explaining more of that universe is bad? If so, I still think that just comes from a nostalgic place again. You talk about how the Jedi and the Force and so forth were great because of their sense of mystery and mystique. I totally get that, and even agree with it; it was awesome because of those things. But the quintessential truth about them both never changes, regardless of how much you see of the Jedi or how much pseudo-science there is about the Force. The Force remains an all-powerful force binding everything together, and the Jedi remain figures of mystique. In the Prequels, they are framed - from the opening scene of Episode I in fact - as being figures of near-mythical stature. It provides the very root of their influence as guardians of peace and justice.

    I'm the first to champion less is more, truthfully, and I totally get why expanding those elements might 'kill' some of the magic for people. But I also think this gets over-played a hell of a lot. "Poring over it" is, quite honestly, ridiculously over the top mate. There's no poring at all. There's a line in TPM about the whole medicholorian (however the hell you spell it!) thing and then it never gets mentioned in the films again. Ever. Instead, the focus remains heavily on the mystical aspect of the Prequels. That's not "Who are the Jedi?" as much as it is, "Who is this Jedi?" It's all about Anakin, how he came to be and whether or not he's the Chosen One, and there remains as much mystery behind those ideas as there does behind what on earth a Jedi was in the first place.

    Ultimately, all of these things are why making sure you watch them in an effective order (or think of the story in an effective order anyway) is vitally important to how much enjoyment you get from them. I've never once disliked the Prequels; I always loved them. But I loved them even more when I discovered the Machete/Flashback Order, which recasts Anakin from a brat to a tragedy in a very powerful way. That in turns strikes at the ultimate point here. These aren't a stand-alone film, a two-parter and a prequel trilogy. They're one single story and should be viewed as such. The fact GL isn't as great a film maker as history once had him pegged is common knowledge, and shouldn't impact on the quality of this six-part (nine-part?) story, or this vibrant and colourful universe, he created.
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  8. #88
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    Ok, let's try this again now I'm back on the laptop. Let's let this 'column' go.

    As you may have seen before, there's a couple of places where you've read something in that I wasn't trying to suggest. I am not trying to imply that Empire has credit as a standalone film, because it's so clearly the first half of a two-parter. What I was trying to suggest is that when you actually look at Return of the Jedi, it is massively flawed, and it is largely saved because of the associations that it has with being so close to the best film of the original trilogy. In short, people wouldn't think it was so good if it hadn't been set-up by Empire and was so close to it in the timeframe and continuity of the story.

    The other place where you've got something that I wasn't trying to say is on Empire opening up the story. No, I'm not trying to say that it is good because it opens up the rest of the universe. Those two facts were somewhat incidental to each other. If anything I'd say the reverse is probably true. Because it's the best film, it then leads to a greater interest in opening up the rest of the universe. But yeah, both the exploration and the explanation are neither good nor bad in themselves, but it becomes a matter of how they are handled. Empire handles them well, hence increased interest in the Universe from that point (even pressure to deliver). The first two prequels generally handle them in either a poor or average way for the most part, hence why the explanations are largely unsatisfying. Again - George worked well with some quite simple elements. Complicating the simple elements was often beyond his ability. Some of the authors who wrote Star Wars books were able to elaborate with far more success, and I read a lot of those books when I was older than the time I saw TPM. So again, just to repeat, as Bananarama and the Funboy Five once said, 'It ain't what you do, it's the way that you do it'.

    You may have a point about the word 'poring' being inappropriate but it's probably less so than your use of the word 'decry'. I mean, I've been very careful to defend the third one and even the second, although my support of that has been more cautious. I haven't seen TPM in so long I can't contradict you as to the use specifically of the pseudoscience stuff, but I would counter by saying that the whole looking behind the curtain in that first film was widely considered unsuccessful, that was just the most obvious example, and truth be told even if it is more limited then I'd say the only thing you can draw is that the damage it did to the first movie is out of proportion to its size. It comes back to the simple elements with a lot of pressure on them, I think. I fully get why you'd want to explore the things at the heart of the universe but it was a big swing that didn't pay off.

    My ultimately, to counter yours, is that to say it's just one story is a bit of an oversimplification. At one level they are, but they obviously aren't just that. With my scholar's hat on, I'd say that you can't ignore the context of production, which is of a story in at least four different stages. You've got the standalone movie that no one wants to make and then becomes a massive hit. You've got the two-part extension to that which turns it from an interesting moment in 1970s culture to arguably the biggest franchise in film. And then if you want to think of the other trilogy as a single unit (though arguably I think you can make a case for seeing TPM as completely separate, a la A New Hope) that's the third, the one that is Lucas dominated but comes fifteen years after, both when he's a very different man and the audience is very different. And finally there's this new Disney, corporate, collaborative phase that we're living in now. And the realities of those differences mean it often doesn't feel like one whole story. In fact, the things that often held it all together better was the Expanded Universe - games, novels etc - rather than just the movies. So yeah, you've got the Universe and the massive tapestry and I do still love all of that stuff, but at the same time if we're looking to really assess it, my training tells me it wouldn't be wise at all to ignore the real-world impact on what we see on screen (if that doesn't come across as a bit too Jedi in itself).

    So those are, for me, the facts. Sure, nostalgia had an impact, especially on the guys who were already 25 or 30 by the time TPM rolled around. But it doesn't change the fact that the prequels were made in a very different time and place, that Lucas probably struggled to balance exploring the things at the heart of his world with making a film that delivered what a Star Wars film is supposed to offer. And yes, the gap isn't as big as some people would have you believe - I'll admit there's no Star Wars movie as bad as the first Star Trek movie, for example. But that still doesn't mean it's close between the two trilogies. And based on episode 7 I'd say it wouldn't be close between the first set and this new one, although the trailer for episode 8 I saw yesterday has got me more optimistic.

    The other thing that makes me think it isn't all nostalgia is that I really wanted to like TPM. I wasn't a jaded 20 something, I was in my early teens, and it took me a couple of years to even admit that I thought it wasn't up to scratch. Going through all this has reminded me of the fact that for a long time I lied that I liked the film more than I did, which is a bit funny to remember.


    Actually, that makes me think. Devil's advocate here, but have you considered that, as you were a child when you first saw it, your own nostalgia can't be discounted? That while it's obviously given an unfair slanting by people who think Jar-Jar spunked all over their childhood, that you can't help but see it through the rose-tinted glasses of a ten-year old in the same way that I watch Gerry Anderson's Supermarionation stuff with a stupid grin on my face?
    Last edited by Prime Time; 11-01-2017 at 07:16 PM.

  9. #89
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    ..."what a Star Wars film is supposed to offer." Out of interest, what is that, to you?

    There's been talk recently by Abrams that Episode IX is going to need to bring all three trilogies together to help create a sense of cohesion some believe lacks. The reason I don't believe it lacks is because I've sat down and watched them all in a day on multiple occasions; both from 1 - 6 and in the flashback order (the latter being far superior) and you can comfortably believe they're a single story. (Probably because they are....)

    Using one example of a discrepancy I have seen fans sometimes criticise, the changing aesthetics of the film I believe help, rather than hinder the portrayal of a changing universe. The Prequels are all sleek and shiny and glossy and they should be; it's a society at the pinnacle of its growth, about to recede in devastating fashion. The Originals, famous for their 'used future' look, feel exactly as they should; a battle-scarred vista of planets neglected by a totalitarian regime with no interest in the common people. There's nearly twenty years between the two trilogies in story-terms; it would be daft for the universe to be unchanged in that time, especially considering the drastic events that take place. Then the Sequels show an even sparser version of that same world having hit rock bottom and featuring rival political entities vying to rebuild in their own image; it's the complete inverse of the Prequels, as it should be. Point being, as ridiculous as it sounds, I believe that there is some cohesion to be found in the film-making changes in each trilogy because of how it feeds into how this reality alters over the span of the half century we see it in; it ties them together, I think, rather than separates them. Just a thought really.

    As to your point on nostalgia, there is absolutely an element of that. In fact, I will freely admit that I probably go a little over-board in my praise for the Prequels as a natural response to the vile criticism they come under, which I genuinely believe is unfair, unwarranted and over-played. It's difficult, as a Star Wars fan, to seek out conversations about it and writing and articles about it and be consistently confronted with the notion that films you loved as a kid somehow, and I'm loathe to even quote the phrase, "raped the childhoods" of others. It sometimes feels like you're not allowed to be nostalgic for the Prequels because 'they're not in the same league.' I guess I'm just thin-skinned.... Having said that, my line that the Prequels are better than people pretend, and on par with the Originals in general terms, comes as much from a dispassionate appraisal of what I believe to be the respective qualities and failings of each as it does nostalgia. After all, I saw the Originals before the Prequels, and as a child just like everyone else. I actually got banned as a kid from watching it because I'd replayed the video of it that much. I even saw them in the cinema, because of their Special Edition re-release in 1997.

    I guess that's my best slice of evidence, actually, to show that my opinion, while in part altered by nostalgia, isn't over-whelmed by it. I've never cared about what changes GL makes to any of the films as they've been subsequently released and re-released in different formats; and that applies to the Prequels as well as to the Originals. My mindset has always been, this is GL's story and how he tells it is how it is. Of course, that's gotten a bit muddier now Disney have taken over....

    PS: They digitally remastered Thunderbirds in the early 1990s on BBC2, and that show was a regular, major part of my childhood too. I love the Andersonverse, and have all of the Thunderbirds episodes across both series on DVD!
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  10. #90
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    I absolutely loathed episode I. Had not watched it for years. And told 'Plan on Twitter that they were showing all the Star Wars movies from the start here every week leading up to episode VIII. But as I told him I gave it a go and it was actually not as bad as I once remembered. And when I would always sit down and rewatch them in the machete order I would completely skip it. I won't be doing that again. But even with episode I being as bad as I thought it was I thought the prequels were treated way to harshly compared to the originals. I thought episode II and III were 2 of the best 3 of the 6 made. Matter of fact I think episode III is all around the best Star Wars movie made. The prequels were always going to have unfair criticism as we knew the pay off. It was all about the journey of Ani. And episodes II and III were fantastic is his journey to the dark side. And once this trilogy is over I fully expect episodes VII-IX to be the best of the trilogies

  11. #91
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    Well, a Star Wars film is first and foremost a Romance isn't it, so first and foremost it's an action-adventure thing. You need all the classic elements of Romance. And I don't know that they were missing necessarily as they were less successfully executed.

    The hardest one to quantify that is missing is 'fun', because it's really hard to really dig down into that. It doesn't even have an easy comparison that you can make with quality. But the prequels, even the good ones, are not 'fun'. Return of the Jedi and Episode VII are not amazing films, but they are 'fun' and that makes up for a multitude of sins. I know this will sound like an unsatisfactory answer and I've not thought it through well enough to really put it into words that I am happy with myself, but I'm sure that there's more than a grain of truth to it.

    Again, they're a single story at one level - but they're also not, because a lot of the details of that story are generated at completely different times. So what you've got is a core story that works, and becomes more convincing as you move closer to the heart of it in episode three, but less convincing connection to that single story in places where George finally sat down and started to try and fill in the gaps. There is a part of me that thinks Lucas may have been better off conceiving a smaller story when he came back to it that allowed him to get to the bits that were at the core of the story much faster, and maybe managed it in two films rather than as a trilogy. Obviously you can't map that on to the current prequels because that'd leave them feeling gutted, but you'd have to make drastic changes to episode I and II that might even leave them unrecognisable.

    I have no issue at all with your point about the changing aesthetic. I would side with you on that ahead of the people making that criticism. I think that's as much a criticism of CGI vs modelling that has been dressed up as something more substantial. Sure, CGI is often less satisfying, but they do give you options that you didn't have with models.

    Meh, tell anyone who says you can't be nostalgic about TPM to fuck off. That's your right. Just don't tell me it's as good as the others! As for the criticism of the film - some of it's vile, but honestly that's generally stuff done deliberately to get a rise I think. Most of it that I've seen has veered from fair enough to slightly harsh. And then most of the real criticism of the film says that it's average, not bad - well made as a piece of cinema but ultimately badly written.

    Not to be a dick, but isn't the whole point of nostalgia that it renders dispassionate analysis impossible? But yeah, I don't think the point about seeing the others first will hold up in your case because it only really works when you're talking about a big enough passage of years in between. For the record, I don't think it really works for me, either. I think you'd have to be 16 or older - and even then you'd have to be a huge cynic - for it to be a factor. Otherwise you've still got the child's light or the adolescent passion to kind of follow through.

    The trouble is of course that it isn't George Lucas's story - not once he puts it out into the world. It becomes common property, maybe not legally but at a more important and fundamental level. I think part of the problem that Lucas has had has become he still feels very much like it is his, but that his view of the matter is so old fashioned. You'd have a hard time getting a critic under 60 to agree with him for example.

    Those Thunderbirds remasters were the ones I would have watched too, and I have them all now. Maybe we should start a Gerry Anderson thread?!


    EDIT: Matt, I don't think II is good as all that, but it's fine. Not bad. Plot's are still a bit muddled but yeah, it's not bad at all. I feel like I should watch Episode I again now I'm in my thirties, but I don't own it, it's hardly ever repeated, and I'm not buying the prequels just for the hell of it. I didn't see anything in VII to make me think it will be the best of the three. It was fun but that was all. More a comeback tour than anything else. The new one could be fun judging by the trailer though.

    The real question is how many 'Star Wars Stories' there are going to be, because that might really be the future.
    Last edited by Prime Time; 11-05-2017 at 09:17 AM.

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    Giving this a quick bump, because we're exactly one month from the US release date for Star Wars Episode VIII: The Last Jedi.

    We'll actually get it a bit earlier in the UK (and so will Australia), and in parts of Europe it's out on the 13th of December.

    Anyone going to try and brave the crowds and get in amongst the first screenings, or will it be a lay low from the internet for a couple of days to avoid spoilers and catch it when it calms down?

  13. #93
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    I am not sure how it works in the UK and other countries, but here in the states for you can buy your ticket online and actually pick your seat. So there are no more lines at all. Also with big movies to be released, like Star Wars, tickets have been on sale for about a month already, so I have my ticket for Thursday Dec 14 already.

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    Oh yeah, you can do that here too, but realistically for a big movie like this you'll get herded around a lot here. It won't be just as easy as you rock up and take your seat, there'll be queues to get in, ticket checks left, right and centre, you name it. I saw Episode III at 1 minute past midnight on the day it came out (because I did stuff like that back then) and even though we'd booked weeks in advance to get into that screening it was very, very organised.

    Good for you for going for the early one. Me, I'll probably hold off for a day or two.

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    Well here, all you have to do is literally show the QR code on your email and you are in. No lines, unless multiple arrive at the same time, but basically no lines or hassle.

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    It may be different here if you're one of those people who rock up at the last minute. I'm not one of those guys, so once you've got your ticket you tend to find yourself in a line waiting to get into the screening if it's a big film, and you'll probably show your ticket there. And then, if it's a really big film, you'll have to show your ticket again when you make it to the auditorium. And for something where the seating is actually assigned (it usually isn't), if the cinema is likely to be full there'll probably be ushers on hand to move people around. As I say, it was like that for Episode III.

    Not very Star Wars-y, this chat, is it?


    There's also two dates flying around for the Han Solo movie. One is next May. The other is that although that's the 'official' date, they're expecting it to be delayed and that it'll actually come out around a year from now, just in time for Christmas 2018 (giving them Christmas 2019 for Episode 9).

    The bigger news, though, is that Disney are so happy with this movie that before anyone has seen it they're supposed to have greenlit a whole new trilogy for him to direct. It'll apparently be set far away from the Skywalker storyline and the idea is to open up the Universe still further. I wouldn't be surprised if it wound up being set parallel to, but separate from, the original trilogy. But it's anyone's guess at this point.

  17. #97
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    Well the working of the theater is kind of star Warsy. But here. If you have your ticket bought online, you also buy your actual seat, so no lines bc everyone already knows where they are going to sit. Most people come before the trailers, some during, and some after. But there are usually no lines to any movie anymore.

    Yes I heard about the next trilogy. But I am not sure how it will be related to the existing 12 movies. However with the Force Awakens basically being a "remake" of A New Hope I should hope (no pun intended) that the new trilogy is not just another copy of the originals.

    What I would like it to be is a trilogy set in the past. With the plot being set around Darth Plagueis and his rise and training of Darth Sidious and a simultaneous plot (and they do not have to interact, but they should) about a young Yoda.

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    No freakin' way am I braving opening day crowds. The earliest I might try to go is that Sunday but most likely I'll leave it for a week or two. Maybe it's my age, but I rarely feel the need to rush about immediately see anything anymore. The movie isn't going anywhere, you know?

  19. #99
    Samuel Plan
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Posts
    213
    Have my midnight ticket booked!

    Not sure which chain you visit most Prime, but as an Unlimited member mine's Cineworld. There's queues galore there - queues to get the ticket from self-service; queues to get concessions; queues to get into the screening (for a big movie anyway). There's also assigned seating and no ushers, which is a lot of fun when someone decides for no apparently good reason whatsoever to cause the havoc of a domino effect by taking somebody else's seat. That's especially great when somebody turns up ten minutes into the film and has their phone light full blast because they can't read the seat and row numbers, only to find someone else in their seat, and then everyone swaps around...and then the late people can't decide which of their own seats they'd prefer to sit in so they start pratting about for another two minutes...then take their coats off and organise themselves and turn their phone screens down (because god forbid we go two hours not checking them...)....

    I love going to the cinema. I hate people who go to the cinema. For a country as fussy as ours, there sure as hell is a severe lack of etiquette in the movies these days.
    101 WWE Matches To See Before You Die: The Book is now available to buy on Amazon UK, Amazon US and Amazon Europe! Just search for "101 WWE Matches" and it'll pop up!

    ~ Samuel Plan

  20. #100
    Squared
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    3,385
    I've got the Odeon equivalent of that. It's not so bad in my experience, because there's generally unassigned seating and if it is going to be busy it's well ushered, at least in my experience. Though to be honest I've not tried to see a major blockbuster on the Imax screen which I imagine is the worst for it.

    Ah, midnight screenings. To be young again!

    Honestly, 'Plan, I thought you'd have way more to say about the prospect of this fourth trilogy....

  21. #101
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    Gold Coast, Australia
    Posts
    769
    I'll be there for the midnight screening and braving the annoying crowd. Will have to line up for a while to make sure I get a decent seat. And then will go back a couple days later and see it in "Gold Class." $22 a ticket but the cinema only holds 28 and you get fancy lounge chairs that go back and the bottom comes out to rest your legs on and all that jazz. Order drinks and food and dessert and all that too to come out during the movie. It's what I did last year. I couldn't not go to the midnight screening as I was petrified of something being spoilt. More so this year as I'm expecting something big to happen at the end.

  22. #102
    Samuel Plan
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Posts
    213
    Yeah, expecting a big plot twist myself.

    Prime, the midnight showing was my mate's idea. Honestly, I'd prefer to wait till the following morning. Generally speaking I tend to enjoy films less at midnight. Being tired often hinders the experience, but I guess we'll see how it goes.

    As for the fourth trilogy, honestly I've no strong opinion until more facts emerge. I'm not inherently opposed to them exploring more of the Wars mythos beyond the Skywalker story.
    101 WWE Matches To See Before You Die: The Book is now available to buy on Amazon UK, Amazon US and Amazon Europe! Just search for "101 WWE Matches" and it'll pop up!

    ~ Samuel Plan

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