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Thread: Terrorist Playground - Kiss me I知 IrishSarah

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    Queen of Extreme Irishsara's Avatar
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    Terrorist Playground - Kiss me I知 IrishSarah

    I have been writing this for awhile now. I have changed my mind a few times on posting it. Its really long. I was going to turn it into two columns then I thought screw it. Post the monster. This column involves terrorism. I have a very nuanced view of terrorism which I have expressed many times on this forum. The 1981 Hunger Strikes are an important event. This is a very serious issue. Should we name things in honor of people that members of the community find abhorrent? Personally, I grew up seeing the hunger strikers as heroes. Their example of non-violent resistance changed The Provisional IRA, Sinn Fein, the INLA and the perception of Irish populations of the world. I see those men and women who went on Hunger Strike as heroes which made the ultimate sacrifice for something they believe in.

    If you like this thread, feel free to check out my other thread in the sanctuary on the Bloody Sunday incident in Northern Ireland : http://www.lordsofpain.tv/showthread...I-m-IrishSarah

    My parents had left Northern Ireland by the time of the Hunger Strikes of 1981 and my farther watched it intensely. I know he had a lot of guilt about leaving Northern Ireland. His parents still lived in Derry at the time. My Grandfather died not soon after this and my Grandmother moved to the States and lived with us for most of my childhood (she has her own apartment now and is still quite independent but in 1981 she didn’t even know how to drive). I have watched a lot of documentaries and read a lot of books on this issue . I’d love to know what everyone else feels about it.

    Kiss me I'm Irish Sarah

    Terrorist Playground?


    In 2001, the local council government named a Children’s park in Newry, County Down, Northern Ireland “Raymond McCreesh Park” . Raymond McCreesh was an IRA Volunteer , who died on hunger strike in I the Maze prison in 1981 at the age of 24. Ray McCreesh was born in Newry and lived in the village of Camlough, just outside Newry. His family is still very active in the local community.

    Since the Nationalist parties of Northern Ireland (which made up the majority on the council) voted to name the Park for Raymond McCreesh, it has been a highly publicized example of the sectarian viewpoint of Northern Ireland. Nationalist politicians have (for the most part) described the park as a memorial to a local boy who gave his life for something he believes in. Nationalists describe Ray McCreesh as a hero and a martyr of the Republican struggle for Irish freedom. The Unionist parties have described it as a shrine to the glorification of terrorism. They describe McCreesh as a violent criminal, convicted terrorist and murderer. Unionist politicians say that this decision shows contempt for the victims of terrorism and it normalizes IRA terrorism and murder. They argue that actions like this grant legitimacy to the IRA’s bloody terror campaign.

    This fundamental disagreement has lead to votes to overturn the name in 2008 when it was investigated by the council, 2012 and yet again in 2015. Each time, the local public which the park serves demonstrated support for the name, the votes were counted and the name stayed.

    What drew me, an Irish-American (dual citizen) to this story is that, fundamentally, this argument is about the criminalization of the actions of Raymond McCreesh and his struggle. This is the same argument that Ray McCreesh was fighting when he went on hunger strike. Ray went on his strike to protest the labeling of him, and his other republican prisoners as criminals.



    Hunger Strike

    Why is Ray McCreesh considered a martyr and not just a freedom fighter? Raymond McCreesh died on the 1981 Hunger Strike.

    This story starts in 1972. In May 1972, Provisional IRA prisoners in Crumlin Road Jail,went on a hunger strike for the right to be treated as 'prisoners of war'. The British Conservative government caved to the prisoners' demands. This granted special category status on those convicted of terrorism-related offences while in prison. They were not common criminals but political prisoners held as Prisoners of War.

    In 1976, the new Labor government withdrew Special Category Status for convicted paramilitary prisoners. These prisoners were stored in the legendary H-Blocks of the Maze prison and would now be treated like common criminals. They would have to wear prison uniform and do prison work. This was an attempt by Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher to criminalize Republican prisoners and thereby change the perception of the public to see the Provisional IRA as a criminal gang.

    The H-Blocks were a hell. The guards were in complete control. There was no oversight. (From here on I will refer to the guards by the name they earned. Screws) . Prisoners were often stripped, placed in punishment cells, had mail withheld, had mail destroyed, food and water was often withheld and even prolonged stress positions were used against inmates. Gangs of screws would enter Republican convicts cells and dish out savage beatings. These brutalities were intended to break the spirit of the resistance. There was a payment in blood for the screws too. Nineteen prison officers were killed were killed from 1972 to 1981 (that includes prison governors, administrators and chief screws).

    I know some people think that the Northern Ireland conflict was between Catholics and Protestants. It wasn’t. While it is true that the Orange Loyalist state which repressed the rights of Catholics and Nationalists was mostly Protestant in nature, the IRA rarely protected Catholic members of the British occupation for religious reasons. For example, Paddy Joe Kerr was a Catholic from a staunch Catholic community. He often lead many of the beatings coming back from Sunday Mass. In 1985 Paddy Joe Kerr was shot dead by the IRA on the steps of Armagh’s St. Patrick's Cathedral as he and his young son were leaving Sunday Mass.

    The prisoners began to use non-violent protest to fight their criminalization. They reached into the history of the Republican movement. Throughout history, Republican prisoners refused to be treated as common criminals. Often Republican prisoners would go naked rather than wearing a prison uniform. Half of the Republican Prisoners (and a few loyalist ones) refused to wear the uniform. There were consequences. The beatings increased. The prisoners were not allowed to have anything in their cells but a mattress, a blanket and a bible. This was called “going on the blanket” The Screws refused to allow prisoners who were clad in their blanket to leave their cell. This meant giving up Mass, visits and communication with the outside.

    When the screws refused towels to the prisoners, the prisoners responded by going on the dirty protest. Spoiled food and shit began to build up in their cells. The smell was horrible and the bugs and maggots were horrific. The prisoners were stripped of the normal parts of prison life. There was no exercise or fresh air. The prisoners were stripped of books, newspapers, radio, cigarettes and even contact with other people and the outside world. The Thatcher government was unmoved. The prisoners were criminals and not political prisoners.

    A majority of the Nationalist population outside the prison did not support the IRA. They supported the non-violent protest for civil rights. A minority though supported the Republican movement and it was this support which allowed them to stand up to the British Security Establishment in Northern Ireland. The majority though saw the horror of the H-Blocks and it began to turn public opinion. To the common nationalists of Northern Ireland the men in the H-Blocks were political prisoners demanding their rights established over a century or more.

    The Government was steadfast in 1980 and there were almost 400 men and women prisoners “on the blanket”. There was a growing movement among the prisoners that the Government was going to leave them to rot and their only alternative was an extreme one. a hunger strike.

    The hunger strike is one of the most treasured tools in Irish Republican history. Those who die become almost mythological . the most celebrated hunger striker before the H-Blocks was Terence McSwiney, Lord Mayor of Cork, who died in Brixton prison in 1920 after 74 days. The hunger strike holds such power because of what it represents. It is paying the ultimate cost and enduring the most horrible end for one’s beliefs. When someone is completely powerless, the only power they have is to end their own life. Suicide is a sin in the Catholic faith which leads to eternal damnation. A man on hunger strike does not just sacrifice his life but perhaps his eternity as well. It is a powerful touchstone to the Irish community.

    The first Hunger strike began in 1980. Darkie Hughes, Tommy McKearney, Raymond McCartney, Tom McFeeley, Sean McKenna, Leo Green, and John Nixon went on Hunger strike with five simple demands. After 53 days on the hunger strike and Sean McKenna on the verge of death, the government sent a settlement document to the prisoners. The prisoners called off the strike thinking they had an agreement. The government reneged . Margret Thatcher gave her reason : “Let me make one point about the hunger strike in the Maze Prison. I want this to be utterly clear. There can be no political justification for murder or any other crime. The government will never concede political status to the hunger strikers or to any others convicted of a criminal offence in the province.”

    In 1981, after the British went back on the promises made to the first strikers, a new group of prisoners went on hunger strike. It was led by Bobby Sands, leader of the Provisional IRA prisoners in the Maze. Sands ordered that the new strike would have a staggered start. A new prisoner would join each week, thereby creating sustained pressure on the British government. The prisoners had five simple demands: the right not to wear a prison uniform, the right not to do prison work, the right of free association with other prisoners, and to organize education and recreation amongst themselves, the right to one visit, one letter and one package per week, full restoration of “good time” that they lost through the protest. All of these things the government had given and then taken away. They denied them now. Thatcher was no going to capitulate to criminals.

    The story of the strike is long and personal. I recommend everyone watch a documentary on it (or at least check out the film by ). I will focus here on two men. One is Bobby Sands and the other Is Raymond McCreesh. Bobby was the IRA commander in The Maze Prison at the time of the hunger strikes. He was famous. Bobby had been denied trial by jury and had been given 14 years in prison for possession of a firearm (in a car he was in) and IRA membership by the judge. He was charismatic and very vocal. He was a hero to those men in their concrete cells. Raymond was different. Ray was an IRA volunteer with many engagements despite his young age. His selection for the hunger strike was controversial because he so quiet and wasn’t a famous IRA man. He was known for being deeply religious and Ray’s brother was a priest. When Ray was told that his brother Father Brian McCreesh was speaking at marches in support of his brother’s protests, he retorted that he was afraid it was going to get his brother excommunicated.

    This hunger strike had a much greater public effect than the previous one. There were many marches and non violent protests during the march. The violence increased too. The IRA and the INLA increased their operations. Support and recruitment for Republican paramilitaries skyrocketed. The common nationalist people throughout Ireland really began to sympathize with the strikers and their plight.

    It was at the beginning of the hunger strikes, that the Member of Parliament for Fermanagh-South Tyrone died. An election was held for his replacement and Sinn Fein, The Social Democratic Liberal Party and the Labour Party decided to unite behind Bobby Sands as the election candidate. On, Bobby Sands received 30,493 votes and the Unionist candidate received 29,046. Bobby Sands was elected Member of the British Parliament for Fermanagh-South Tyrone from his prison cell. The People of for Fermanagh and South Tyrone elected a terrorist to public office.


    Thatcher soon released her answer to the Hunger Strikes in response to the election of Bobby Sands. She said "We are not prepared to consider special category status for certain groups of people serving sentences for crime. Crime is crime is crime, it is not political".

    Many people met with the Hunger Strikers in an attempt to negotiate an end to the hunger strike. Even people from the Vatican attempted to negotiate a settlement. The British government was intransigent. The Prisoners did not budge on their five demands.

    Bobby Sands Member of Parliament for Fermanagh-South Tyrone was the first of the 1981 Hunger Strikers to die. He died after 66 days on hunger strike. He had been a Member of the Parliament at Westminster for 25 days.

    After Bobby Sands died, Margaret Thatcher showed zero regret and said, "Mr. Sands was a convicted criminal. He chose to take his own life. It was a choice that his organisation did not allow to many of its victims". After Bobby died, there was an outpouring of grief from the entire world. The French President wanted to attend Bobby’s funeral. Over 100,000 people attended Bobby Sand’s funeral. Thousands marched in Paris. There were riots across the Republic of Ireland. In Dublin, protesters almost succeeded in burning down the British Embassy. My favorite reaction to Bobby Sand’s death came from Iran. The Iranian Government renamed Winston Churchill Boulevard to Bobby Sands Street, prompting the Embassy of the United Kingdom in Tehran to move its entrance door to avoid using Bobby Sands Street as it’s address. The back of the British Embassy still bears a street sign saying “Bobby Sands Street militant Irish guerrilla” in Persian.

    When Bobby Sands died, Ray McCreesh was already in really bad shape in the prison infirmary. Ray had gone almost totally blind and was lapsing in and out of unconsciousness. His brother, Father Brian McCreesh, performed had granted him absolution, given him Communion, and performed the Last Rites on his last day. 16 days after the death of Bobby Sands, Raymond McCreesh and Patsy O’hara died. They were the third and fourth men to die on the Hunger Strike. Raymond had been on the hunger strike for 61 days.

    After he died, Ray’s body was whisked to Daisy Hill hospital (very near where the park that bears his name today) and his body was saved the degradations that many of the other hunger strikers suffered. Patsy O’Hara died on the same day as Ray. His body had post mortem burns that had been inflicted upon him after death. Even in death, the screws had to try to harm him.

    The funeral of Ray McCreesh was a joyus affair. Five priests presided over his funeral mass. The President of Sinn Fein gave his grave side oration. His brothers carried the casket flanked by masked IRA Volunteers and he had a full military funeral with his coffin draped in the Irish Tricolor. Thousands marched in protest through New York on the Saturday after the deaths of McCreesh and O’Hara in a solidarity march in their honor.

    In all, 10 prisoners died before the strike was called off on October 3rd 1981. The British government made no public concessions to the strikers, but over time, the British government would accede to all five of the hunger strikers demands. This didn’t stop Thatcher from trying to criminalize the Irish Republican Struggle. In the words of Bobby Sands - “They will not criminalise us, rob us of our true identity, steal our individualism, depoliticise us, churn us out as systemised, institutionalised, decent law-abiding robots. Never will they label our liberation struggle as criminal.”

    If you ask me? This is what done it, Sinn Fein became a political force and would eventually lead The IRA to put down it’s guns to give peace a chance to win the Long War. The peace movement in the IRA came out of the prisons. The political wing was forged in prison. It was the year after the death of Bobby Sands that Sinn Fein began to stand for elections in both Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland. Today, Sinn Fein is the second largest party in Northern Ireland (Last Westminster election, Sinn Fein received the largest number of votes in Northern Ireland. In the republic, the last opinion poll put Sinn Fein’s share of the vote at 21 percent. It was the hunger strike through, where belief in the ballot box began to make peace with belief in the bullet.

    Blessed are those who hunger for justice - Matthew 5:6


    Here is a hunger strike documentary : http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature...&v=RtXCfLT9WdU

    The park was named after Raymond McCreesh on the 20th anniversary of the IRA hunger strike.

    If you are at all curious about The Hunger Strikes I recommend the film Hunger (its on your Netflix) with Michael Fassbender as Bobby Sands.


    Bobby Sands is easy to love. He never killed anybody, he never committed any terrorist attack. He was arrested under murky circumstances for possession of a firearm and being a member of a terrorist organization.

    Raymond McCreesh – Terrorist

    Raymond McCreesh was a terrorist. Ray was an IRA Volunteer. He has been accused of many offences. Most of them true. He was a member of the South Armagh Brigade of the IRA, which was one of the most active paramilitary groups in the troubles. The South Armagh Brigade was so effective that Soldiers had to travel by helicopter because of the threat of snipers, ambushes and roadside bombs. It was so dangerous that food and supplies had to be flown in to the military bases. He was only 19 when he was arrested in a firefight with the British Army.

    He was a very active member of the IRA. His job as a milkman meant that he knew the local area quite well and took part in many operations. It is said that Ray used that knowledge to shoot Sammy Rodgers in the back in 1975. When you read articles about the park, they refer to Sammy Rodgers as a Protestant Farmer, in an attempt to make it seem more sectarian but(according to a newspaper article from 1977) Sammy had been a part-time member of the Ulster Defense Regiment. This made him a veteran of the UDR when he was shot.

    Raymond is said to have been involved in an attack on a military helicopter and attempted murder of security force personnel at Carrickbroad, Forkhill, in 1976 and the murder of Royal Ulster Constabulary Detective Constable Andrew Johnston in 1976. Raymond was probably involved in many other ambushes and attacks on the British occupation in Northern Ireland. Unfortunately, thanks to the overzealous work of the PNSI and the British Government, even legitimate historical inquiry may never break the IRA’s code of silence and much of what Ray did in the IRA may never be known. Unlike Bobby Sands and many of the other hunger strikers, Raymond McCreesh was a hard man and a man of violence and action for his cause. He was a true IRA man. He was also a Martyr to the Irish people.

    Alleged Involvement in the Kingsmill Massacre

    On January 5th, 1976, Masked members of the Irish Republican Army, South Armagh Brigade stopped a minibus of 12 textile workers near the village of Kingsmill. The workers were marched out a gun point and the masked men asked all the occupants of the vehicle what religion they were.

    The only Catholic worker was ordered away from the scene and the 11 remaining workmates were then lined up on the side of the road. One of the men, Alan Black was shot 18 times, but survived. The rest were killed in a hale of automatic gunfire (A total of 136 rounds were fired in less than a minute.). 10 Protestant civillians were killed in retaliation for the killing of 6 catholic civilians by the Glenanne gang (an alliance of loyalist militants, British soldiers and Royal Ulster Constabulary police officers). The Protestants gunned down in the Kingsmill massacre were innocents that were targeted for naked sectarian reasons. This is an atrocity.

    Raymond McCreesh was never convicted of this crime. The IRA cell which he was connected to was never directly connected to this crime. The Brigade that he was a member of was connected to this crime. The Historical Enquiries Team (a police unit investigating unsolved murders from the Troubles) found that there was evidence that a .223 calibre Colt AR-15 Armalite recovered in the arrest of Raymond McCreesh was used in the Kingsmill Massacre. This is damning evidence except for the fact that the Historical Enquiries Team also linked two other men to the same weapon. On the day of the ambush, Ray had been armed with the M1 Garand rifle. The family of Raymond McCreesh deny that there is any evidence directly linking Ray to the Kingsmill Massacre and also say that a full investigation of the facts would vindicate any involvement. If you ask me, this is another example of the British institutions in Ireland using selective information in an attempt to delegitimize the IRA. It is Jean McConville all over again.

    the Kingsmill Massacre has also been linked to British Paratrooper Captain Robert Niarac (the commander of the men who executed the massacre had a British accent) and others within the South Armagh Brigade.

    The Arrest and Imprisonment of Raymond McCreesh

    Raymond McCreesh and three other men were on a mission to ambush a covert observation post operated by the Parachute Regiment which was surveilling the Mountain House Inn. The problem is that they were seen by another group of British paratroopers. The British troops saw them and opened fire first (according to Lance-Corporal David Jones) without warning. McCreesh and one of his comrades took cover in a farm house until their surrender was negotiated by a local catholic priest. Raymond McCreesh was only 19 years old when he was arrested.

    When he was brought to trial, Ray refused to recognize the court and was tried without a jury. Raymond McCreesh was (rightly) convicted of attempted murder, conspiracy to murder, possession of firearms with intent to endanger life and IRA membership. He was sentenced to 14 years. He was 20 years old.

    In prison, Raymond was “on the blanket” for four years. The hunger striker’s dedication even won a grudging admiration from the loyalist prisoners in the Maze. They were on the same H-Blocks and endured many of the same degradations. Even among the Loyalist paramilitaries, the men on the hunger strike were not seen as criminals. They were soldiers for a cause. Ray died at the age of 24.

    On his grave, in the cemetery next to his family’s home, his tombstone reads “Beidh an bua againn go foill” which means “We will win yet”.


    Naming a Children’s Park For a Freedom Fighter/Terrorist.

    Raymond McCreesh is a famous martyr to the Irish Struggle. The action he is most remembered for is the ultimate expression of non-violent resistance. Raymond McCreesh was a man of violence. He was a warrior and a soldier for a cause he was willing to die for before he was a martyr to Irish Freedom. The people of his home town named a park after him. People from the other side of the conflict flipped out. In their eyes, he is a criminal terrorist.

    I believe this is an example of the criminalization of the Irish movement. This is the reason that Raymond McCreesh went on hunger strike. The Unionists want to criminalize the very memory of Raymond McCreesh. They want to create laws which make his memory illegal. They want any mention of him positively to be glorification of terrorism (which is a crime in the UK). I support the home town of Raymond McCreesh being able to name a park after him because his death changed Ireland. He IS a hero and his non-violent actions make him a martyr. The vast majority of the people in the town support the actions (to a ridiculous degree like 1,000 to one in the public comment period). Part of a shared future and a shared community means allowing for the heroes of that community to be honored.

    The same Unionists who want public funding to go to sectarian marches with bands named after convicted terrorists . The same Unionists support a statute of unionist gunrunner Edward Carson which stannds in front of Stormont (the Northern Ireland Assembly building) . They name things for Churchill (who killed thousands of civilians and committed war crimes) , Oliver Cromwell (who put entire Irish towns to the sword, killed tens of thousands of Irishmen and stripped most Catholic landowners of their land to give to protestants) and other bigots and blood soaked killers from history. They aren’t exactly speaking from the moral high ground.

    Nelson Mandela was a terrorist who had much respect for McCreesh and Bobby Sands. He even lead a hunger strike while imprisoned on Robben Island prison during apartheid in South Africa. Things are named for him all the time and he was a supporter of violent revolution if peace could not be achieved peacefully.

    The thing is tho, I live in America. Monuments to terrorists are just part of life. This is a country founded by terrorists (The Sons of Liberty are clearly a revolutionary terrorist organization and the Minutemen were clearly a paramilitary terrorist organization ). In America, there are many statutes and memorials to “Irish Terrorists”. Heck, even the Hunger strikers have a cross dedicated to them in Hartford, Connecticut there is a statute of James Connolly in in Union Park Chicago. There are so many statutes to Irish rebels in America, lets look at just one Irish revolutionary. Robert Emmet was an Irish rebel leader who was a major leader of two Irish insurrections and was executed by the British Crown. (Fun Fact, Robert Emmet was the last person to be hanged, drawn and quartered in the UK). There is a statute of Robert Emmet Massachusetts Ave. & 24th in Washington, D.C. There is a statute of Robert Emmet at the California Academy of Sciences, in Golden Gate Park in San Francisco and even a Robert Emmet Elementary School in Chicago. They named the towns of Emmetsburg, Iowa, Emmet, Nebraska, and Emmett, Michigan after him. That is just one Irish revolutionary executed by the British Crown for treason in 1803 and who never set foot in America.

    So, back to the park itself. Unless the Northern Ireland Assembly changes the laws or one of the Nationalist parties in the local area of Newry change their minds (I’m looking at you SDLP), it seems that the Raymond McCreesh play park is here to stay. Both sides have done some serious demagoguery on the issue and the SDLP Leader has attempted to get his local council members to change their minds (they avoided the vote instead) but at the end of the day, after 10 years of people trying to change it, the Park still bears the name of Raymond McCreesh Member of the IRA and Martyr to Irish Freedom.

    So what do you guys think? Is it ok to name a park after a terrorist? Can you memorialize a violent terrorists? How do you reconcile all the monuments in your own country to terrorists with how you feel about it abstractly? Did you actually read this whole thing?

    In closing I want to quote Bobby Sands. "Our revenge will be the laughter of our children." And those children will do that laughing from Raymond McCreesh Park in Newry, Northern Ireland.

    Tiochfaidh ar la
    Last edited by Irishsara; 04-21-2015 at 02:17 AM.

  2. #2
    Senior Member JacobWrestledGod's Avatar
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    Amazing piece of article.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Irishsara View Post
    In 1976, the new Labor government (led by Margret Thatcher “Milk Snatcher”)

    I've not read the whole thing as yet - as you say yourself, it's quite long - but thought you might want to amend this. Margaret Thatcher led the Conservatives, not Labour, and she became PM in 1979, not 1976. I'm not sure who you are thinking of (there were two labour PM's in 1976), but it could be Harold Wilson and it could be Jim Callaghan.

    Will come back and finish when I get a bit of time.

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    Queen of Extreme Irishsara's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Prime Time View Post
    I've not read the whole thing as yet - as you say yourself, it's quite long - but thought you might want to amend this. Margaret Thatcher led the Conservatives, not Labour, and she became PM in 1979, not 1976. I'm not sure who you are thinking of (there were two labour PM's in 1976), but it could be Harold Wilson and it could be Jim Callaghan.
    Yeah it was James Callaghan. I was writing this mostly from memory and a 2 page college paper i wrote on it. Some of the Raymond McCreesh – Terrorist dates are a little squishy too but I didnt think anyone read it so I didnt worry about it.
    Last edited by Irishsara; 04-20-2015 at 09:37 PM.

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    Queen of Extreme Irishsara's Avatar
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    So Saint Patrick's day is coming up and I was curious if you all would want me to do another one of these.

    I was thinking either something on The Easter Rising (Maybe on James Connolly) or the Rise and Stall of Sinn Fein (Maybe on Gerry Adams and the Sinn Fein/IRA connection). Or i could do something less drab like historical breakdowns of some of the famous Irish tunes commonly heard on St. Patrick's Day?

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    Senior Member JacobWrestledGod's Avatar
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    I ma completely out of the knowing in terms of Irish politics, but go ahead and write. Not much of an audience though.
    And Jacob wrestled with God.






  8. #8
    I'd enjoy reading a James Connolly article.

    Enjoyed this one too, well written and informative.

    RIP Bobby Sands, Francis Hughes, Ray McCresh, Paty O'Hara, Joe McDonnell, Martin Hurson, Kevin Lynch, Kieran Doherty, Thomas McElwee, Micky Devine. Heroes all. What those men did is unfathomable and I agree completely, it laid the foundation for the peace process and democratic solutions.

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    Queen of Extreme Irishsara's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flaming Banana View Post
    I'd enjoy reading a James Connolly article.

    Enjoyed this one too, well written and informative.
    Thank you. I am glad someone read it. I liked writing these. I've started a few and I will probably pick one to really go after for posting around St. Patrick's Day. I am currently writing something on Samoa Joe which will be posted before that.

    I am thinking maybe something on James Connolly, his atheism, his nationalism and his communism or maybe something on the Starry Plough in Ireland writing a bit about Larkin, Whyte, Connolly, McCann and Patsy O'Hara. But with the retirement of Martin McGuinness maybe I should either write something about Marty or Big Bobby Storey. I think that Bobby's history paints an interesting picture of the troubles and the transition from Terrorist to Peacemaker with a whiff of cordite quite well.

    Oh and for a little update about the park. The Equality Commission has directed the Newry, Mourne and Down Council to walk back through the naming process once again, citing concerns about transparency. The SDLP has been flipping and flopping because they understand the local love in the Republican community for Ray's memory. Also they are currently in the process of merging the park with the with Barcroft Community Centre park but it probably won't change the name. The name of the park has stood through legal challenges and pressure from Unionists so far. It will be interesting to keep an eye on it in the next year.

  10. #10
    The name of the park will stand, cannot see it changing. I think it should too.

    No matter what you choose to write i'll read it, your threads are interesting, iformative and I have to say my belief leave me loving the topics. Was talking to a Sein Fein election campaigner last night at the door, he said Martin is doing a lot better than when he appeared on TV. I know his nephews well, will get a chat to one of them soon and see how he is.

  11. #11
    ^ hey, I used to love this guy!

  12. #12
    I used to rock in fairness, drank a lot more then but it seems i've my work cut out this time, no-one fucking posts anymore!

    Oh and hi Slap.

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    All the crying nerds went home and took their ball with them after getting flamed too much by slap, & getting their sexual advances shut down by Sarah. Tito is busy firing employees at his local walmart, villano died of a heart attack. FMM, he thinks he is too white to post at some ghetto message board like LOP. Marvin is MIA, presumed locked up in a mental institution, albooboo lost his dialing wand in his fat rolls / has yet to fish it out so we havent heard from him in awhile. Zuma is connecting with his aztec roots down in mexico, he got the dosage of ayahuasca wrong, and he has yet to return from his spirit journey.

    Well that's all the usual suspects off the top of my head.. as you can see Sarah is still around trying to shove her global elitist agenda down everyone's throat, slap is still trolling, although he took his antics to the next stage and beat up his neighbor because he was trolling slap on twitter. The dud is a quasi welcomed newcomer, his trolls are pathetic, but at least he adds some character to the otherwise dead board.

  14. #14
    Cheers. I do recognise some of those names. Good to know they're all dead or still posting. Yeah, im choosing that as I couldn't be arsed reading what was actually written. I liked Marvin. I think.

    There used to be some English fella, I remember him but cannae mind his name. Think it was Villano who banned me everytime I registered based on a tenuous story that I once linked a sex chatroom and he didn't like it or something, can't remember the details.

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    Who is this mysterious, yet handsome, marvin character?

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    He is Mr. Alarming. Word has it he can talk to the dead, he fooled all the people with magic, and he is waiting on satans door.

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    Oh, Mr Crowley

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    Quote Originally Posted by Flaming Banana View Post
    I liked Marvin. I think.

    There used to be some English fella, I remember him but cannae mind his name. Think it was Villano who banned me everytime I registered based on a tenuous story that I once linked a sex chatroom and he didn't like it or something, can't remember the details.
    Marvin got in an e-fight with Blade and committed suicide over it. Blade ended up doing the same after an embarrassing altercation at the HoS ironically.

    Vil started his own (pathetic) board and "resigned" from lop. Then he asked to be an admin again and they said no and he committed suicide.

    Lots of suicides over e-arguments that revolved around this board and the HoS.

  19. #19
    Junior Member
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    No, I just started using reddit.

  20. #20
    Funny, I've become a 4chan *** myself

  21. #21
    That's a lot of fucking suicides. Anyone not kill themselves? HJow'd they do it? I've tried a few times and always ballsed it up, but i've decided i'm actually fuck awesome and immortal, so yeah, meh.

  22. #22
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    I'm living in the twilight zone.

  23. #23
    Martin McGuinness died. Protestants on my Twitter Timeline are celebrating.

  24. #24
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    Another cowardly terrorist gone. Good.

  25. #25
    Aint it Fun The Dude's Avatar
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    I lied when I said I live in the UK.

    I'm actually in Iran fighting for Isis. This site is how I recruit people. I can PM you a Isis starter kit telling you how to make home made explosives you can smuggle onto planes.

  26. #26
    Quote Originally Posted by Aqualung View Post
    Another cowardly terrorist gone. Good.
    Had I been born a decade earlier, i'd undoubtably have taken up arms as well. A foreign army was killing civilians and enforcing outdated ideals on an oppresed populace who had no real means of fighting back. Well they found a means and fought hard against the crown. Then, when both sides realised an armed struggle was working for neither, he embraced the peace process, to the detriment of his standing in Derry, fuck even some of his family turned their backs on him at that stage and never got over it. Northern Ireland would be in a worse position were it not for Martin McGuinness and others like him.

    RIP sir.

  27. #27
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    You'd have probably ended up shot by a squaddie at a roadblock. What a loss to LOP that would've been!

  28. #28

  29. #29
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-northern-ireland-39365919

    http://longtowerchurch.org/webcam/

    How many of you will receive a state funeral, broadcast live on tv? Bill Clinton among the mourners.

    RIP Martin McGuinness, freedom fighter, peace maker, son of Doire.

  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flaming Banana View Post
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-northern-ireland-39365919

    http://longtowerchurch.org/webcam/

    How many of you will receive a state funeral, broadcast live on tv? Bill Clinton among the mourners.

    RIP Martin McGuinness, freedom fighter, peace maker, son of Doire.
    Aye, saying goodbye they are in their own way. Outlawed tunes, on outlawed pipes. They did the same for me and your father's father.

  31. #31
    He's not William fucking Wallace.

  32. #32
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    Bill Clinton didn't attend the funeral for William Wallace. A proper state funeral calls for Outlawed tunes on Outlawed Pipes, it's Irish Tradition. I ought to know, my ancestors are from Ireland.

  33. #33
    Everyone thinks their ancestors are from Ireland. We're like the most popular nationality in the fucking world. Momuments worldwide go green on March 17th, that does not happen for any other national day. Being Irish fucking rocks.

  34. #34
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    That was a jab at Irish Sarah and slap. I'm a quarter cherokee, a 9th Mexican, along with a liter of European hog wash thrown in there for good measure.

  35. #35
    You're a Heinz, like the beans, 57 varieties. Basically a mutt.

  36. #36
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    I am an officially recognized tribal member, I am Native American by Law. I dress up and attend the powwows and I even live in BLM housing on the Rez.
    Last edited by GNR711; 03-29-2017 at 02:12 AM.

  37. #37
    lol @ BLM housing

  38. #38
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    has sarah been brought up on terrorism charges yet ?

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